Tag Archives: Elliott Waves

Learn to Label Elliott Waves More Accurately

EWI Senior Analyst Jeffrey Kennedy shows you how to use momentum patterns to confirm your count

By Elliott Wave International

Are you looking for an easy way to improve your confidence as you analyze the charts you trade? Take a quick look at this chart (adapted from Jeffrey Kennedy’s December 26 Elliott Wave Junctures lesson) to see how divergence relationships help clarify your analysis.

According to Jeffrey, divergence relationships are easy to identify. Whenever prices make a new extreme, look for underlying indicators to move in the opposite direction. Specifically,

The momentum relationship most often seen in waves 3 and 5 is divergence. Bullish divergence forms when prices make a new low while an accompanying indicator does not. Conversely, bearish divergence occurs when prices register a new high while an accompanying indicator does not. Bullish and bearish divergences are common to waves A and C, just as they are waves 3 and 5.

Notice the bearish divergence between waves 3 and 5 in the daily price chart of Halliburton Company (HAL) — Prices reach a new high, yet the MACD indicator moves in the opposite direction:

Jeffrey notes that if you label an advance as a 5th wave move, and yet you do not see momentum divergence, that tends to argue for an extended 5th wave.

Next, at waves A and C, you can see an example of bullish divergence. Wave A bottomed at $32.90 in HAL and wave C ended much lower at $29.83. The histogram readings that correspond to waves A and C are -36.26 and -26.60, respectively.

Here’s another example of divergence between waves A and C in Akamai Technologies (AKAM).

Notice that wave C is lower in price than wave A. However, if you look at the MACD histogram, you’ll see that it registered a higher reading in wave C than it did in wave A, thus giving us a bullish divergence.

Understanding that Elliott waves demonstrate unique momentum relationships as well as price structure allows you to label waves more accurately and with greater confidence.


Learn to Use Technical Indicators to Improve Your Trading and Analysis

This is merely one chart example of how you can use technical indicators to strengthen your analysis. You can also learn about Moving Averages, one of Jeffrey Kennedy’s favorite indicators, in a Free 10-page eBook from Elliott Wave International.

Moving averages are one of the most widely-used methods of technical analysis because they are simple to use, and they work. Now you can learn how to apply them to your trading and investing in this free 10-page eBook. Learn step-by-step how moving averages can help you find high-confidence trading opportunities.

Improve your trading and investing with Moving Averages! Download Your Free eBook Now >>

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline Learn to Label Elliott Waves More Accurately. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

(VIDEO) GBP/USD: How Elliott Wave Patterns Predicted Recent Drop Under 1.60

A great 6-minute video lesson in Elliott wave analysis of forex markets

By Elliott Wave International

Every Friday, the editor of EWI’s forex-focused Currency Specialty Service, Jim Martens, records a video update for his subscribers. Each video delivers a real-life lesson on Elliott wave application to forex markets.

Watch this 6-minute video Jim recorded on October 12. Jim called for cable (GBP/USD) to drop below 1.60 in wave 5 of the developing Elliott wave sequence.

Ten days later, on October 23, GBP/USD fell as low as 1.5925.


Download Your Free 14-page eBook: “Trading Forex: How the Elliott Wave Principle Can Boost Your Forex Success”

Here’s some of what you’ll learn:

  1. Which Elliott waves to trade
  2. Which Elliott waves set up your forex trade
  3. When your analysis is wrong
  4. Guidelines for projecting price targets
  5. How to evaluate an Elliott wave structure
  6. How to use the bigger picture to give you perspective on the market’s next major move

Jim also takes you through two real-world trading examples to reinforce what you’ve learned and apply it to your own trading.

All you need is a free Club EWI profile to download this FREE 14-page eBook now >>

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline (VIDEO) GBP/USD: How Elliott Wave Patterns Predicted Recent Drop Under 1.60. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

USD/JPY: Lemons into Lemonade

How Elliott wave analysis helps you as a forex trader with built-in, risk-defining safeguards
November 29, 2012

By Elliott Wave International

Elliott wave analysis is not a crystal ball. (No market-forecasting method is.)

But here’s what is remarkable: Even when your Elliott wave forecast doesn’t pan out, you have built-in safeguards to alert you — and help you manage risk. Here’s a real-life example.

Going into the November 14 low, USD/JPY charts had been showing an impulsive downward Elliott wave pattern. Impulses are 5-wave moves, but on November 13-14, the pattern looked incomplete: the fifth wave down seemed to be missing.

Here’s a chart our Currency Specialty Service subscribers saw early on November 13:

So, our analysis on November 13 suggested that USD/JPY would fall further. But USD/JPY just would not fall; instead, it went sideways.

That suggested to our Currency Specialty Service team that the wave (4) you see in the chart above was extending. Perhaps it was developing as another Elliott wave pattern — maybe a contracting triangle? This chart and analysis described to subscribers that scenario:

“A bearish fourth-wave triangle is another idea that’s in a position to yield new lows in wave (5). Resistance rests at 79.655/765.”

Note that line: “Resistance rests at 79.655/765” — it represents the very risk-defining safeguards I mentioned earlier.

How? Well, there are things that Elliott wave patterns just are not allowed to do. In a contracting triangle (an A-B-C-D-E formation), prices must stay within converging trendlines — and they cannot overlap the start of wave A, the origin of the pattern. Resistance at 79.655/765 was exactly that: the price point where the contracting triangle interpretation would be invalidated.

Practical application: If you were bearish on USD/JPY on November 14, you could have used the price area of 79.655/765 to manage your position risk.

As you probably know, USD/JPY did not go sideways for long. Nor did it go down. Soon after, it went higher and breached that key resistance level:

When one Elliott wave pattern ends, another one begins. As soon as that key resistance in USD/JPY was breached, a new road map for the Japanese yen became clear.


Download Your Free 14-page eBook: “Trading Forex: How the Elliott Wave Principle Can Boost Your Forex Success”

Here’s some of what you’ll learn:

  1. Which Elliott waves to trade
  2. Which Elliott waves set up your forex trade
  3. When your analysis is wrong
  4. Guidelines for projecting price targets
  5. How to evaluate an Elliott wave structure
  6. How to use the bigger picture to give you perspective on the market’s next major move

Jim also takes you through two real-world trading examples to reinforce what you’ve learned and apply it to your own trading.

All you need is a free Club EWI profile to download this FREE 14-page eBook now >>

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline USD/JPY: Lemons into Lemonade. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

A Four-Chart Lesson in Spotting Trade Setups

By Elliott Wave International

You can find low-risk, high-probability trading opportunities by trading with the trend. The trick is to find the end of market corrections, so you can position yourself for the next move in the direction of the trend.

This excerpt from Jeffrey Kennedy’s free 47-page eBook How to Spot Trading Opportunities explains where to find bullish and bearish trade setups in your charts and how to zero-in on these opportunities. If this lesson interests you, the full 47-page eBook is free through July 6.

On the left-hand side of the illustration below, there are two bullish trade setups. As traders, we want to wait for the wave (2) correction to be complete so we can catch the move up in wave (3) – this is the trade. What we are trying to do in this bullish trade setup is anticipate the potential for profits on the buy-side as prices move up in wave (3). Another bullish trade setup is at the end of wave (4).

As traders, we are looking to buy the pullback and position ourselves within the direction of the larger up-trend. Remember, three-wave moves are corrections, which means that they are countertrend structures. On the other hand, five-wave moves define the larger trend. As traders, we want to determine what the trend is and trade in the direction of the trend. Our buying opportunity to rejoin the trend is whenever the trend pauses and forms a correction.

Now, let’s look at the right-hand side of the illustration where we see two bearish setups. When a five-wave move is complete, it is retraced in three waves as a correction. The end of the five-wave move presents the first trading opportunity that we can take advantage of the short side (or the sell side) as the wave (A) down begins.

Notice the second bearish trade setup gives us another shorting opportunity as wave (B) tops.

So, within the classic wave pattern of five waves up and three waves down, we have four high-probability trading opportunities in which we are either positioning ourselves in the direction of the trend or identifying termination points of a trend. I want to share with you some tricks I have picked up over the years about how to analyze corrective waves and their termination points. The single most important thing I’ve learned from analyzing corrections is that corrective or countertrend price action is usually contained by parallel lines.

As shown above, draw the parallel lines by beginning at the origin of wave A and going to the extreme of wave B. You draw a parallel of that line off the extreme of wave A. So basically you have a small, slightly angled downward price channel. This will show you the containment region for wave C. It also shows you an area toward the bottom of the lower trend line where you can expect a reversal in price.

Here is another example. Again, you draw the parallel lines off the origin of wave A, the extreme of wave A and the extreme of wave B.

Toward the upper end of the upper trend line, you will usually see a reversal in price.

This example shows how countertrend price action is contained by parallel lines in the British pound, 60-minute, all sessions. Why is it important to know parallel lines contain the corrective or countertrend price action? Number one, it will increase your confidence that you are indeed labeling a countertrend move properly. Number two, it identifies areas where you will likely see prices reverse. For example, we see this reversal up near the top.

Improve Your Success with 14 Actionable Lessons in Trading This brief trading lesson is just a small example of the opportunities you can find once you learn to identify key market patterns. Learn more in your free 47-page eBook, How to Spot Trading Opportunities. This valuable eBook is regularly $79, but you can get it free through July 6. Download your free copy of How to Spot Trading Opportunities now.

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

EUR/USD: Falling on “Risk Aversion”? Let’s Look at the Timeline First

It’s not the “bad news” from Europe that has been pushing the euro lower
May 19, 2011

By Elliott Wave International

From the May 4 top near $1.4950, the EUR/USD (the euro-dollar exchange rate and the most actively-traded forex pair) has fallen as low as $1.4050 on May 16.

In other words, the dollar has gained 9 full cents on the euro in less than two weeks. That’s a huge move, and people want explanations. And what the media offers boils down to “risk aversion,” in light of “the bad news from Greece.” And that sounds good — until you check the timeline.

The latest wave of trouble in Europe started on May 3, when Portugal asked for a bailout. If you think that event is what pushed forex traders towards “risk aversion” — think again. The euro happily gained against the U.S. dollar the following day, May 4, pushing the exchange rate to that high near $1.50.

And if you think the trouble in Greece pushed the EUR/USD lower — again, please reconsider. Greece made a splash in the news on May 9, when its credit rating was downgraded. But by then the EUR/USD had already fallen some 700 pips, to the mid $1.42 range.

So, as good and logical as all the mainstream stories sound about “risk aversion” and “bad news from Europe,” the timing of events doesn’t fit. What then gave the dollar the strength — and at a time when almost everyone expected it to only fall further?

Believe it or not (and it’s easy to believe it, because, as this example shows, there’s no better explanation) the news doesn’t set broad trends in forex. Collective emotions of forex traders do. In early May, the majority was betting against the dollar. When everyone places their bets and there is no new money left to push the price further, it has no choice but to reverse.

That’s why it pays to be extra cautious in the financial markets when everyone takes the same side of a trade. True, markets can stay overbought or oversold for a while, but the reversal inevitably comes — and the stronger the one-sided conviction, the bigger the reversal.

The advantage Elliott wave analysis gives you is this: Wave patterns in forex charts track the collective mindset of the market players. By anticipating the price points where the Elliott wave pattern should end, you get a pretty good idea of where the trend should stop and reverse.
See for yourself how it works — FREE — during EWI’s Forex FreeWeek now through May 26. Learn more >>


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This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline EUR/USD: Falling on “Risk Aversion”? Let’s Look at the Timeline First. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.

Big Advantages of Trading with the Wave Principle

By Elliott Wave International

What advantages does the Wave Principle offer to traders?

Here’s one of the big advantages of using the Wave Principle when trading: you can increase your understanding of how current price action relates to the market’s larger trend.

Other tools fall short in this regard. Several trend-following indicators such as oscillators and sentiment measures have their strong points, yet they generally fail to reveal the maturity of a trend. Moreover, these technical approaches to trading are not as useful in establishing price targets as the Wave Principle.

Here’s another big advantage of using the Wave Principle in your trading, which comes directly from the free eBook “How the Wave Principle Can Improve Your Trading”

“Technical studies can pick out many trading opportunities, but the Wave Principle helps traders discern which ones have the highest probability of being successful.”

Indeed, this valuable free eBook shows you how to identify and exploit the market’s price pattern, as shown in the Elliott wave structure below:

The Wave Principle also helps you to identify price levels where you may want to place protective stops.

“…although the Wave Principle is highly regarded as an analytical tool, many traders abandon it when they trade in real-time — mainly because they don’t think it provides the defined rules and guidelines of a typical trading system.

But not so fast — although the Wave Principle isn’t a trading “system,” its built-in rules do show you where to place protective stops in real-time trading.”
“How the Wave Principle Can Improve Your Trading”

Before you attempt to identify price levels for protective or trailing stops, you should first become familiar with these three rules of the Wave Principle:

  • Wave 2 can never retrace more than 100 percent of wave 1
  • Wave 4 may never end in the price territory of wave 1
  • Wave 3 may never be the shortest impulse wave of waves 1, 3, and 5

The details and specific instructions for placing protective and trailing stops are in the BONUS section of the free eBook, “How the Wave Principle Can Improve Your Trading.”

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • How the Wave Principle provides you with price targets
  • How it gives you specific “points of ruin”: At what point does a trade fail?
  • What specific trading opportunities the Wave Principle offers you
  • How to use the Wave Principle to set protective stops

Keep reading this free lesson now.

This article was syndicated by Elliott Wave International and was originally published under the headline Big Advantages of Trading with the Wave Principle. EWI is the world’s largest market forecasting firm. Its staff of full-time analysts led by Chartered Market Technician Robert Prechter provides 24-hour-a-day market analysis to institutional and private investors around the world.